Obama ended April with $115 million in bank
May 18th, 2012
06:19 PM ET

Obama ended April with $115 million in bank

(CNN) – President Barack Obama's campaign ended the month of April with over $115 million in the bank, federal campaign filings posted Friday showed.

The campaign had $115,157,432.79 cash on hand after raising $25.7 million that month. Combined with other Democratic efforts, including the Democratic National Committee, they raised $43.6 million in April, slightly more than the $40.1 million GOP candidate Mitt Romney and his allies raised. Romney ended the month with $104 million cash on hand.

But Obama's campaign did report debt: $1,200 owed to a Nebraska company for telemarketing.

-CNN's Kevin Bohn and Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report


Topics: 2012 Election
Obama hosts G8, NATO leaders
May 18th, 2012
06:18 PM ET

Obama hosts G8, NATO leaders

Washington (CNN) - U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are set to address a host of pressing economic and military security issues this weekend as the United States hosts a high stakes Group of Eight summit outside Washington and a NATO summit in Obama's adopted hometown of Chicago.

A user's guide to the Chicago NATO summit

The three-day diplomatic marathon kicked off Friday morning with remarks by Obama on the rising concern over global food security. Obama outlined a new international effort to address hunger in Africa and elsewhere, calling it a moral, economic and security imperative.

Full story


Topics: President Obama
Meeting in the Oval
May 18th, 2012
02:23 PM ET

Meeting in the Oval

President Obama met with newly elected French President Francois Hollande Friday. The two will attend the G8 summit at Camp David this weekend.


Topics: Uncategorized
Helping the world's hungry feed themselves
May 18th, 2012
10:17 AM ET

Helping the world's hungry feed themselves

The campaign to feed the world's poor will get some much needed star power Friday when Bono, co-founder of the global advocacy organization ONE, arrives to rally leaders of the Group of Eight industrialized nations to take action.

While the crisis in the eurozone will no doubt top the agenda when the G8 leaders gather Friday for a two-day summit, the talks will also tackle the issue of food security and ways to feed a growing world population.

At their annual summit in L'Aquila, Italy, in 2009, leaders pledged to provide $20 billion to fight hunger in the developing world over three years. Since then, U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have embraced food security as a signature foreign policy issue, working to support farmers in Africa and other developing countries to improve agriculture.

Now, those 2009 commitments are set to expire. In an age of shrinking aid budgets with fewer resources available, donor governments can't solve the problem of world hunger alone.

Rajiv Shah, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, said in an interview that major gains have been made in reducing hunger in most of the world, with the exception of sub-Saharan Africa. While he said the private sector has been interested in developing the African market, companies have been reluctant because of corruption and a lack of infrastructure.

Click here for the full story  at CNN's Security Clearance blog


Topics: Africa • Food Security • G-8
POTUS Day Ahead: G-8 edition
May 18th, 2012
07:43 AM ET

POTUS Day Ahead: G-8 edition

Friday marks the beginning of the G-8 summit at Camp David. Leaders from eight of the largest economies in the world will be arriving at Washington’s Dulles Airport throughout the day, and in the morning President Obama will hold his first meeting with newly elected French President Francois Hollande.

Following his bilateral meeting at the White House, Hollande will head across the street to Blair House for a luncheon hosted by Secretary Hillary Clinton.

The G8 schedule begins with working dinner for leaders only at Camp David on Friday night. National Security Adviser Tom Donilon said the dinner would include conversations on “regional and political issues” with a focus on “security issues.”

Specifically, Donilon said likely issues include Iran, where the U.S. is looking to advance the theme of international unity as well as preview expectations of the May 23rd second round of meetings with Iranians in Baghdad; North Korea; Burma, where the administration is emphasizing “remarkable progress” and “the start of a long but promising path towards democracy;” and Syria.

Saturday the summit will turn to the global economic crisis, which is widely seen as the central focus of the G8 meeting. Additionally there will be separate sessions dedicated to energy and climate, food security, the Afghan economic transition and the Middle East and North Africa transition. Donilon also emphasized on Thursday that leaders would likely have individual meetings on the “margins” of the larger conference, citing this as one of the prime reasons why Camp David was selected as the site for this summit.

But before all the G8 excitement begins, Obama is scheduled to deliver what White House officials have called “a very important speech” on food security at the Reagan building on Friday morning. To add to the conversation on food security at Camp David, four African leaders will also be attending the summit – current chairman of the African Union, Yayi Bonin of Benin, Prime Minister Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia, President Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania and President Atta Mills of Ghana. These leaders were chosen because of their work on food security in their own nations.

Below is the full schedule as released by the White House:

FULL POST


Topics: Daily Schedule • G-8